The attack on Atmara

Scenario
As a result of the massacre of Bimbashi Bumble’s Punitive Expeditionary Force there was a general upsurge of discontent and violence in Southern Zubia, particularly along the border with Sadun. The Khedive seemed unable to respond, and as a result the commander of the Zubian Army sent one of his best young officers – Miralai Ahmed Kurti – to the nearest provincial capital – Atmara – to ensure that it was properly fortified and able to resist an attack. The commander also sent a consignment of new magazine rifles to arm the town’s garrison.The garrison comprised:

  • Four Infantry Battalions
  • An Artillery Battery
  • A Machine Gun Battery

This proved to be a very sensible course of action and when Miralai Kurti arrived in Atmara he found it to be almost devoid of proper fortifications. Within days he had ensured that the town’s defences were repaired and improved, and that the garrison were trained how to use their new rifles and were ready to resist an attack.

The attack was not long in coming.

Turn 1

Atmara’s defences.

A large Native army advanced out of the desert to attack Atmara. Thanks to the successful destruction of Bimbashi Bumble’s Punitive Expeditionary Force, the numbers of insurgents had greatly increased, and besides Infantry (two bands of rifle-armed Native Infantry and six bands of spear-armed Native Infantry) and Cavalry (two bands each of Native Cavalry and Camelry), it now had a battery of ancient smooth-bore field guns.

The Native army on the march.

Turn 2
The Native army’s advance brought them within range of the Zubian Field Artillery …

… who selected as their target a leading band of spear-armed Native Infantry …

… who suffered 25% casualties from the effects of the artillery shells that were fired at them.

The Zubian Machine Gun battery then joined in, and fired at another band of spear-armed Native Infantry …

… whom they almost wiped out!

Turn 3
Before the Native Army could move, the Zubian Field Artillery was able to fire at them for a second time at its previous target …

… and inflicted a further 50% casualties upon it!

As the Natives had the initiative, they surged forward undaunted by the casualties they had already suffered.

The Cavalry and Camelry advanced unhindered towards the flanks of Atmara’s defences whilst the much-depleted band of spear-armed Native Infantry assaulted the position held by the Zubian Machine Gun Battery. Their attack was unsuccessful …

… as was a second that was conducted by another band of spear-armed Native Infantry …

… but a third assault did manage to inflict a casualty on the Zubian Machine Gun Battery.

An assault by the other much-depleted band of spear-armed Native Infantry of the Zubian trenches also proved futile …

… and the rifle fire from one of the two bands of rifle-armed Native Infantry cause no casualties on the entrenched Zubian Field Artillery Battery.

The Native Army closes upon the Zubian defences.

The Zubian Machine Gun Battery opened fire on the large band of spear-armed Native Infantry to its right …

… which it almost destroyed, the survivors falling back to avoid further casualties.

The Zubian Infantry Battalion in the trenches to the left of the Zubian Artillery Battery fired at one of the on-coming bands of Native Camelry …

… inflicting 66% casualties on them.

The Zubian Infantry Battalion in the trenches just behind the Zubian Machine Gun Battery fired at remains of the band of spear-armed Native Infantry in front of them …

… whom they wiped out.

On the right-hand side of Atmara’s defences, the Zubian Infantry Battalion stationed in the trenches fired at one of the advancing bands of Native Cavalry …

… whom the forced to retreat after suffering 33% losses.

Turn 4
As the Zubian Artillery battery was the only Artillery Unit on the battlefield able to fire, it engaged the closest Native Unit, a band of rifle-armed Infantry …

… which it forced back out of single-shot rifle range after causing it 25% casualties.

At this point the battle could have gone either way, and whichever side had the initiative during this move might have been able to assure themselves of victory.

At this point the Zubians gained the initiative!

They began to exploit their advantage by firing their Machine Gun Battery at the nearest full-strength band of Native Infantry …

… which it forced to withdraw after it had suffered 50% casualties.

The Zubian Infantry Regiment in the trenches to the left of the Zubian Field Artillery Battery engaged the sole remaining members of a nearby band of Native Camelry …

… which they destroyed with the rifle fire.

The Zubian Infantry Regiment in the trenches immediately behind the Zubian Machine Gun Battery then fired on the nearest band of spear-armed Native Infantry …

… who were forced to withdraw after almost being wiped out!

On the right-hand side of Atmara’s defences the Zubian Infantry Regiment positioned there chose as its target the nearby band of Native Cavalry …

… which fell back after suffering 33% casualties.

The Native army was now exhausted, and were forced onto the defensive.

The situation on the battlefield at the point when the Native army reached its Exhaustion Point.

The Native army began to withdraw, suffering further casualties as they did so as a result of Artillery and Machine Gun fire. The uprising was suppressed – for the moment – and the Khedive could sit more easily on his throne … although the commander of the Zubian Army had shown that he might be a potent rival in the months and years to come.

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5 Comments on “The attack on Atmara”

  1. David Crook says:

    Hi Bob,

    Outstanding! I am really pleased about this action for a number of reasons as follows:

    1) Visually it looks really impressive and the careful use of the intermediate desert terrain with the full on sand tiles works very well indeed.
    2) The narrative flowed and this confirms (not that it needed any such confirmation!) my thoughts that any game benefits from a back story to draw the reader in and provide a rationale for the action.
    3) It is yet another example of how well the Portable Wargame concept works.
    4) Finally, and probably most importantly, you have been able to get a game in!

    Absolutely loved it Bob and I shall look forward to the next chapter with relish!

    All the best,

    DC

    • Bob Cordery says:

      David,

      This is actually an old battle report that I ‘forgot’ to copy over from my main blog. Reading it made me realise how much I enjoyed fighting this battle.

      All the best,

      Bob

      • David Crook says:

        Hi Bob,

        It was funny, when I was reading it I thought it looked familiar but made the cardinal error of not checking! It was a cracking action though and if you could only see how red faced with embarrassment I am at this oversight….;-)

        All the best,

        DC

  2. Hi Mr. Cordery,
    What a great time you had! It was thrilling to read and a treat for the eyes. I very much enjoyed your campaign, your visuals, and the narrative, and hope that you will be posting more like this in the future. I’ve started looking around your Imagi-world and if you don’t mind, I think I’ll “borrow” a thing or two! I have my own Imagi-Nation from many years back, yet you have taken it to the next level, which is to have an entire world loosely based upon our current world–how very obvious. I’ve pondered my problem with “just” an Imagi-Nation, and you’ve solved the over-all problem it for me!
    Thanks for sharing your website and your fine ideas–now to put your ideas into practice for myself, changing the names to protect the innocent and the guilty! 🙂
    Cheers,
    Brigadier Graemon
    Commanding,
    Special Services & Security Force

    • Many thanks for your kind comments, and I am very pleased that you found this blog – and its background – useful.

      I began with a couple of imagi-nations, but felt that without a bigger picture it was difficult to see how and why they might be at odds with one another. This grew into a regional ‘collection’ of imagi-nations … and from there the next logical step was an imagi-world that was recognisably similar to our own but not quite. The latter allows things to happen that otherwise might raise problems in the real world … and also allows me to let my imagination run wild!

      Please feel free to ‘borrow’ as much as you like; that is what is it there for.

      All the best,

      Bob


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